THE AUTOMOTIVE RESEARCH LIBRARY

1

HORSELESS CARRIAGE FOUNDATION, INC.

HCF Newsletter

Fall  2006 "The Information Place" Volume 8   #3


15th Annual Automobile Heritage Days Show a Big Success

1909 Buick

An estimated 4,000 plus spectators viewed the 15th An­nual National City Automobile Heritage Days Car Show on Sunday, August the 6th. The theme setting car for this year's show was the Chrysler Town & Country, honoring 65 years of continuous production of that one special series of cars. More than 200 cars in 22 separate categories were on display in Kimball Park in National City. Entrants came from several hundred miles away to have their cars judged for the 73 awards that were handed out during the drive through presentation ceremony at the end of the day. The title of the show speaks about the early history of the South Bay and its links to an auto industry that was just be­ginning to grow. The Hunt Brothers took a break from re­building boat engines to become Ford Dealers in 1904. A lack of sales convinced them to return to the business they knew best, working on gas engines. Of course they later took a commission from the owner of the Hotel Del Coro-nado to build him a car that could conquer the rugged Baja

California Peninsula. For many years, the "Hunt" was owned by the late Jim Renzulli and made available for displays on request. That car is now in the collection A. J. Cooley in San Diego.
The oldest car entered-in the show was James Ogden's 1906 Pope-Hartford roadster that he drove to the event from his home in San Diego. Dan Seeman won 1st place in the pre-1915 category with his 1909 Buick tourer. This car was 1st shown in National City 4 years ago by Les Von Nordheim in its original unrestored con­dition. Clarence Scheidle is credited with restoring the Seeman's very attractive car that will undoubtedly see many tours and special events.
Looking forward to their 16th Annual event, the National City Automotive Heritage Days advisory committee de­cided to honor Chevrolet as the marque car for their an­nual show in Kimball Park in 2007, recognizing the 50th anniversary of the introduction of their Nomad series station wag­ons. Introduced to the public in September of 1956, the Nomad was an instant success during the 1957 model year. The Nomad was named Motor Trend's car of the year in 1956 when it was unveiled as their 1957 model series.

By Reid Carroll
1906 Pope

Gil & Blan Klecan Donate a 1985 Cadillac Limousine.
Gil & Blan Klecan have honored the Foundation by donating a 1985 Cadillac Limousine to the Foundation.
The car was sold at auction with the proceeds going toward the Scanning Project. These funds will help with our goal to scan all the archival material into the computers and help preserve the printed page.

We are very grateful to the Klecans for their generous donation.  They have always been big supporters of the Founda­tion and they are always there to help with their time, donations, and support.
Gray & Davis, Amesbury, Mass. The Electric Lighting System which this company has been marketing for some time now will naturally be the leading attraction in its ex­hibit, although, as lamp makers originally, their line of lamps for oil, acetylene gas and electricity will be most complete. The prin­cipal parts of the Gray & Davis electric light­ing system are: A constant speed dynamo driven from the engine or jack shaft by gear, belt or chain: a governor to take care of vary­ing speed of the engine; an electric cut-out to disconnect the dynamo from the battery when running below the charging speed; a battery to operate the lights when the dynamo is not running at the necessary speed, or when the engine is stopped; high-frequency lamps of suitable voltage and power; and the proper connections and plugs for making the system complete in every detail. These may be used on all parts of the car.

Gray & Davis lighting system

Colorado Member "Fletch" Supports Foundation.
The Foundation would like to thank Conrad "Fletch" Fletcher for his continued support of the Library. He has had several "Car howings in the Red Barn" to various car groups including the Lincoln Continental Club of Denver and the Denver Timing Asso-iation. Those groups donations have been forwarded to the Library. We are very grateful for his support.

2007 Membership Pin

2007 Membership Pins Have Arrived.

The new 2007 membership pins have arrived and they are a real beauty. Jack Garri­son has out done himself in his design skills by reproducing our featured car, the front view of the Brush automobile.
The Brush was made from 1907 to 1912 in Detroit, Ml by Alanson P. Brush, who had assisted in the engineering of the first single-cylinder Cadillac in 1902.

The Brush car was little changed during its career because Mr. Brush believed he had reached "perfection of an original idea in motor car construction" early on. Except for some minor changes like horsepower, wheelbase, and pneumatic tires the car re­mained the same, with axles and frames fashioned from oak, hickory, and maple woods, and coil springs at all four corners. Speeds of 35 mph were promised and prices were in the $500 range.

Other automobiles reaching the century mark are Kissel Kar, Atlas, Detroit, Selden, Columbus, Speedwell, IHC, Cunning­ham and Oakland.

The new pins have been sent out to our multiple year members and will be sent to our yearly members on renewal for 2007.

The Foundation is converting from monthly to yearly for renewals and the new renewals will be sent out in October, so make sure you renew so you do not miss out on the new lapel pin
Scanning

Scanning Project on Schedule
The Foundation's Scanning Project is progressing nicely. We have a full time scanner who has scanned in the Cycle & Automobile Trade Journal and is now scanning its successor the Automobile Trade Journal. She has scanned through 1916. The search engines are working great and the research staff is already accessing the hard drive for research material.
Funding the project is proceeding with donations, sales of duplicate automobilia, auctions, car sales and the Col-ctors Foundation grant.
ou will soon see the "/ Scan" patch appearing on jackets and hats. Anyone donating over $100.00 gets a patch and his name ? the plaque hanging in the Library Reading Room.
lyone with questions or who wishes to donate funds to this worthwhile project can access the web page on the www.hcfi.org contact Roberta Watkins at the HCFI Library research@)ri cfi.org 619-464-0301.

A Big Thank You to Foundation Supporters
The Board of Directors of the Horseless Carriage Foundation wishes to express our sincere gratitude to the following or­ganizations, for all their work on behalf of the Foundation.
San Diego Big Three Swap Meet, CA     sponsored by the Horseless Carriage Club of America, San Diego Reg Group
Early Ford V-Eight Club of America, San Diego Chapter Antigue Automobile Club of America, San Diego Chapter
These clubs provide us with a free space and help us in any way they can to promote the Foundation.

Bakersfield Swap Meet, CA
sponsored by the     Kern County Model T Club & the Horseless Carriage Club of America .
With special thanks to Bruce and Edna Rimmer, Gil Klecan, and for 2006, Herb Singe Jr. for their auctioning abilities. They kept things moving with high prices and lots of enthusiasm and fun. Gil Klecan supplies the Library with spaces for the Swap Meet.

Chickasha Pre-War Swap Meet, OK

sponsored by the   Old Pueblo Touring Association
With special thanks to Joe Ersland, Mike and Susie Ersland and family. The Erslands and OPTA go out of their way to supply spaces and tables to enable the Library to sell their excess literature and automobilia items. Don Sable supplies the room accommodations for the Library staff.

Horseless Carriage Club of America Convention
sponsored by the HCCA
We would like to thank the Board of the HCCA for their consideration of allowing us to auction off items and be part of the convention.

The William Evans Garage   
Bill Evans, CA
Bill Evans has honored the Foundation several times by opening his "garage" with his fabulous collection of automobiles and antiques and furnishing a delicious buffet dinner for our annual Foundation Receptions. He has been very generous to the Library and we are very grateful to him.

San Diego Automotive Museum, CA  
Robert Swanson
We wish to thank the Automotive Museum for their hospitality for opening up their museum for our annual Foundation Re­ception. The members were very impressed with their collection and we hope to return there again. Thanks to Gil Klecan for the room costs.

The San Diego Collection, GA    
Charles R. Swimmer
The San Diego Collection was a very nice venue for one of our annual Foundation's receptions. They were very gracious and everyone had a good time.

James Cooley Museum, CA   James Cooley

Thank you to James Cooley who is always available for a reception. He and his wife Carman are always there to help the Foundation.

Member News

 



In Memory of:  

State of Jefferson Antique Car Club
Tom Patris
George & Frances Sherman Gold Country HCCA
David & Sondra Gast
David & Sondra Gast
Gold Country HCCA

Cash Donations:


Surplus Funds from the High Country Tour
George & Frances Sherman's Wedding Anniversary from G. McGregor

Dr. David Lee Klawon in appreciation for Bill Cohen driving the Bride and Groom.

Walt Bolz
Margaret "Maggie" Patris
Ann Hopkins

Jim Renzulli Paul Kettenburg Marjorie Schwed
 
Scanner Donations

Jack Garrison
Dave Gast
Robert Strieter

Allen "Skip" Johnson
David Main
Tom Timmins

John Wohlfeil
William Cohen
Lee Pierce
John Moir
Farrow Smith
Gregory Millard
Patrick Ainslie
Gifts In Kind
Fred Hayward Richard Anderson Charles Mc Mahon     Dr. & Mrs. Merl Ledford Eric Nelson

New HCF Members
Dennis Hood
Matt Hackmen
Alfred Meyer
Ronald Holley
Tom Vizthum
Sandra Lappin
Jeff Schier
Robin Onsoien

Paul Skowronek
Wayne Leonard

Louis Brodrick
Carl Leonard

Victor Motor Starter

The Start-O Company, of 1636 Walnut Ave­nue, Cleveland, Ohio, have just brought out a starter operating from the gas tank by which a charge is forced into the cylinders so that the motor will start when the spark is applied. The starter is placed on the inside of the dash with a foot-button projecting through and from this starter a §/lf>-inch copper tube is led to the intake manifold. The principle em­ployed is the charging of the cylinders upon stopping the motor with a proper volume and mixture of acetylene gas wbielj, being fixed, will remain indefinitely in a condition to fire. Upon pushing the foot-button of this starter, the ignition is cut off and the main valve to the manifold is opened, the gas valve at the same time being lifted off its seat. Until the motor slows down to the last few revolutions the "flow" valve prevents gas and air from entering the manifold, eliminating excessive waste and preventing back-firing. Air and gas are mixed in the starter,

Starter

 

Motor February 1912 Timken-Detroit Axle Company, Detroit, Mich., will exhihit a complete line of the well-known products of this company, including four types of front pleasure-car axles, two types of shaft driven rear axles, and the Timken pressed-steel housings. The Timken axles are designed for cars ranging in weight, when fully equipped, from 2,500 to 4,500 pounds, while the shaft-driven rear axles are designed to accommodate the same weight. All of these rear axles are of the full-floating type
Axle
Nickel-chrome steel is used in many places throughout the construction of these parts, notably in the driving shafts and gears. The feature of the rear axle is to be found in the large size of the brake drums, which in the heavier designs are 17 inches in diameter. The steering knuckles of the front axles are all of nickel steel, while the forgings are heat treated by special formula?. A new product brought out by this company, which will be exhibited for the first time, is a new truck equipment, which is shown in five separate sizes. Inter­esting features will be found in this exhibit in the design of the radius rods used on the rear

1922 Auto Trade Journal

NOW comes the year of increasing pro-
duction and price cut. The year started
with the shifting of personnel, expressing the
discontent of persons and factories. Business
prospects appeared dull' enough to satisfy the
most confirmed pessimist at the start of the
year, but business picked up before the season
was well advanced.

George B. Seidell, of the patent litigation
fame, died January 17.

Harry Rlcardo, the English engine designer.
noted for the combustion chamber design, was
the guest of the S. A. E. meeting in January.

The selective membership plan for the N. A.
D. A. was announced at the annual meeting
In Chicago, and the "One of a Thousand"
slogan adopted. Previously, any dealer who
paid the small annual dues could belong, but,
under the new plan, the member must pass
the scrutiny of fellow members, and dues
were in proportion to volume of business.
This plan was announced by Harry Moock,
general manager ot the association, who re-
signed a month later to join the Hudson sales
staff and was later made sales manager. C. A.
Vane was elected general manager of the N. A.
D. A. He had been assistant manager and
counsel.

Henry Ford bought the Lincoln Motor Co.

A receiver wag named for Locomobile.

At the A. E. A. convention, the work under
the Merchandising Committee was approved
and greater activities were undertaken. In-
cluding a campaign to practically cover the
country.

June production shot to higher figures was
anticipated, and the monthly reports to the
end of the year indicated free buying on the
part of the public,

Elwood Haynes was awarded the John Scott
medal for his accomplishments In stainless
steel, steltlte, and chrome iron. Also, July 4,
a tablet in his honor was unveiled on Pumpkin
Vine Pike, near Kokomo, where the start was
made of the trial of his first automobile,
28 years before. Quite a notable gathering was
present.

The much-talked-of Pierce-Arrow and Lafay-
ette merger was declared off.

Insurance on policies was changed to cover
actual value of the car, which was entirely In-
dependent of the cost. The steady dropping
in price of new cars, which, of course, affected
the used car values, was the cause. Insurance
companies were under the belief that many
cars were deliberately destroyed.

Murphy won the Indianapolla speedway race
at an average of 94.43 m. p. h.

The advertising managers' council for the
M A. M. A. was organized.

In midyear, when production was at pleasant
figures, coal and steel strikes hampered some-
what.

The S, A. B. held a production meeting at
Detroit.

Charles Schwab acquired control of Stutx.
The Townsend road appropriation bill was
passed by Congress.

The Jewett came into the Geld, as a com-
panion for the Paige.

The Star was announced by Durant.

Cleveland automobile dealers began a co-
operative advertising campaign.

Wisconsin condemned the used car price sug-
gestion plan of Milwaukee dealers.

In Mid-October Ford Motor Co. astonished
the trade by a $50 reduction on all models of
cars.
1923
THIS year started with a discussion or the
btK production that was coming. Every-
body was sold on a big year ahead, and so It
proved. May production ran up to 404.692, and
the discussion of the year was en the dealer
profits. The N. A. D. A. annual meeting in
Chicago was outspoken against the forcing
cars upon the dealers. The used cars came
in for a lot of attention and before the end
of the year the organization of the "Used Car
Motor Mart" was announced and the N. A.
It. A. put out a used cor plan.

Gordon Lee resigned as Chief of the Auto-
motive Division of the Department of Com-
merce.

Mrs. Agnes D. Morse, for several years head
of Parish & Bingham, and noted as the only
woman executive of a large factory, announced
her resignation as president of that company.

Bulck completed the millionth car.

The Asbestos Brake Lining Association was
organized and began immediately a campaign
for better brake service as an accident pre-
ventative. Arnold Mowbray was commis-
sioner. Sumner Simpson was president.

Members of the Show Managers' Association
petitioned the M. A. M. A. to permit a wider
latitude to Its members in exhibiting as factory
exhibits in local shows.
The Ford Motor Co. announced the weekly
purchaso plan.

The N. A. D. A. held a series of meetings
on the Pacific Coast as sales congresses. F.
W. A. Vesper, of St I.ouls. and C. B. Gamblll,
of Chicago, were the dealer speakers on the
trip.

Pierre S. du Pont, who had assumed the
presidency of the C M. C. for the reorganiza-
tion, announced his retirement from that office
and the appointment of Alfred P. Sloan, Jr.
Mr. du Pont became chairman of the Board.

The S. A, E- summer meeting, at Spring
Lake. N. J., was enlivened by discussions of
four-wheel brakes and low pressure tires, not
then named balloons.

Plans whereby the Standard Oil Co. would
distribute ethyl fluid, the gasoline addition to
avert knocking, were announced.

W. C. Durant announced the organisation of
the Liberty Bank of New York, the first bank
organised by an automotive Institution.

Changes made In the financial plan of the
Hudson Motor Car Co. permitted this stock,
always closely held, to be placed on the market.
Roy D. Chapin, long president of the company.
was made chairman of the board, and R. B.
Jackson, president

ALAM members
1924
AUTOMOBILE    TRADE   JOURNAL

In final classification probably will be classed as a dealer development year. It started with high production ideas in expectation of a runaway market. Stocks were piled up by fac­tories and some factories forced large stocks upon dealers. The N. A. D. A. outlined a campaign for 5 per cent net on turnover for the dealer. Spring was late, something sanded the business track, and by the time the volume should have been moving things, as concerned the sales, were in a considerable mess. Presi­dent Sloan said that the past season had been a total loss so far as dealer relations and- his company was concerned, and he delivered the "no more overstocking"  statement.
Dealers in many sections petitioned the N. A. C. C. for some action to restrain makers from overloading dealers and to check the flow of new models. The N. A. D. A. backed this move­ment and asked the N. A. C. C. for a consid­erable fund to finance a series of "sales con­ferences" throughout the country. The N. A. C. C. declined but some of the conferences were held. There are many evidences, how­ever, that the relations between dealer and factory  are  on   a  better  basis.
Early in the year it was said that an investi­gation indicated that S. A. E. standards are saving car makers  $124  per car.
Dodge Bros, took to the National Shows an exhibit of the workings of the various depart­ments of the factory. A novel and highly educational exhibit.

The feud of the A. A. A. and the N. M. A., growing out of the split in the A. A. A. con­vention in St. Louis, in 1922, was ended. The A. A. A.  absorbed the N.  M. A.

Percy Owen appointed chief of the Automotive Division of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce   of   the   Department   of   Commerce.
Winton, who started in 1896, announced that the manufacture of automobiles had been dis­continued, and that the Diesel engine plant would be continued.
The M. A. M. A. announced extension of show plans by placing exhibits in New York and Chicago shows in place in time for two trade days before show is opened to public. N. A. C. C. to co-operate in effort to have manufacturers' buyers present for these days. M. A. M. A. also sanctions shows for manu­facturers in Cleveland, Kansas City, and San Francisco.
Olds Motor Works began wholesaling some accessories  for  Olds  dealers.
Ford began manufacture of certain acces­sories for Fords.
Ten-millionth Ford completed and started on transcontinental tour. About 25,000 Fords were made previous to the Model T. Frank Kulick, driver, was a driver of the original Ford racing cars.
Hudson announced new prices on coach, making it $1395, which is $5 less than open car.
General Motors Corporation began publishing monthly  report  of  sales  of  Its cars  at  retail.
Chrysler and Rollin cars made debut at the New York show.
It was the first balloon tire year.
Straight-eight engines added: Jordan, Hup-mobile, Rickenbacker, Auburn, and engine makers.
Mid-year registration for 1924 is 15,523,898 passenger cars and trucks.


Percy Owen appointed chief of the Automotive Division of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce   of   the   Department   of   Commerce.
Winton, who started in 1896, announced that the manufacture of automobiles had been dis­continued, and that the Diesel engine plant would be continued.
The M. A. M. A. announced extension of show plans by placing exhibits in New York and Chicago shows in place in time for two trade days before show is opened to public. N. A. C. C. to co-operate in effort to have manufacturers' buyers present for these days. M. A. M. A. also sanctions shows for manu­facturers in Cleveland, Kansas City, and San Francisco.
Olds Motor Works began wholesaling some accessories  for  Olds  dealers.
Ford began manufacture of certain acces­sories for Fords.
Ten-millionth Ford completed and started on transcontinental tour. About 25,000 Fords were made previous to the Model T. Frank Kulick, driver, was a driver of the original Ford racing cars.
Hudson announced new prices on coach, making it $1395, which is $5 less than open car.
General Motors Corporation began publishing monthly  report  of  sales  of  Its cars  at  retail.
Chrysler and Rollin cars made debut at the New York show.
It was the first balloon tire year.
Straight-eight engines added: Jordan, Hup-mobile, Rickenbacker, Auburn, and engine makers.
Mid-year registration for 1924 is 15,523,898 passenger cars and trucks.


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ACROSS THE CONTINENT FROM SUNRISE TO SUNSET

2
THE LONGEST AIR  FLIGHT

 

 

        Henry Ford's Vision of  Tomorrow

HENRY FORD believes that during the next 10 years the automobile business will be devoted to refine­ment—mechanical refinement and convenience refinement. No startling changes in type should be expected. Almost every­thing affecting essentials has been tried. What comes from now on will represent building upon accepted  fundamentals.

THE really revolutionary thing to be looked for is the enlarged uses that will be found for motor vehicles. More than likely city traction will be motorized. Inter-urban traction also. Motor coaches or stages will popularize passenger travel by "motor road." Steam freight will have the ■■ long hauls and the bulky loads. Lighter loads and short-haul loads will be generally

distributed by motor freight express.

WATCH the influence of the good bus
   one that is light, economical and safe.

THERE  are  a  lot  of  babies  being  born every day.   That answers the saturation point bugaboo.   The world has never reached 1   the saturation point on any useful manufac­tured  commodity.

TRAFFIC problems will take care of themselves. It would be a good begin­ning if traffic rules and regulations were standardized.


MOTOR cars will continue to remove distance as a barrier to business devel­opment. Business will start a movement away from congestion. Land is one of the most plentiful things this country possesses. All out-of-doors is at the disposal of business.

The   motor  car   is   liberating  business   from huddled centers.

EXPORT will furnish a good outlet. Some day immigration may start in the other direction. People may go back and develop the countries they have left. When people become educated they pioneer and move. To educate, them, mix them. The motor car is the great mixer. Education follows the motor car. The motor car builds good roads. Sometimes people think it is the other way 'round—that good roads precede motor cars. If you want good roads, first get your cars. That is the way good roads came to the U. S. What Russia needs is more motor cars.
*THE problem of future service will be A to make and keep used cars as good as new. Machinery, methods and prices for rebuilding used cars will be standardized. This will not hurt business.    It will help it.


GREAT developments of the Zeppelin may be looked for. Airships of the future will utilize all the flying methods which are now used separately. Crossing the Atlantic by airway will become an or­dinary occurence. In this connection it will be well to watch the development of the helicopter.

FARMING will be done by people living in   towns.     Motor   cars   have  made  this possible.

PETTY wars will cease in Europe. Motor cars will neutralize boundary lines. People will mix together and learn that the man across the river or over the mountain is not necessarily an enemy.

1January, 1896—Bean and Lang, manufacturers of the United States Cyclometer, Fond du Lac, Wis., announced that they had in­corporated the United States Mfg. Co., for the production of an odometer of which they said: "The same in principle as the cyclo­meter, but suitable for carriages, which registers 10,000 miles and repeats and is only one inch long and one inch in diameter and costs but $2.25."
The FOX Line is Bringing Profits to Thousands of Ford Dealers

x

Oversize walnut rim,    rust-
proof aluminum spider,   cen-
ter horn button with   con-
cealed wiring. $14.

 

Model UR

Handsome, convenient tilting
wheel with famous Fox
Rigid Lock. $15.

 

Model F

The most protection for the
least money. Exactly same
locking principle as on
more expensive models. With
center horn button, $7.50.

 

Model DH

One of the most popular
models. Hundreds of thou-
sands In use for years.
$13.50.



Fox Steering Wheel Locks are the
most widely used locks for Fords
in the world. The patented rigid
locking principle has established a
record of less than one in 2,000
sold returned for any cause. All
Fox Locks are easy to install or
remove, no cutting or drilling being
required for either operation. Origi-
nal Ford construction is not altered.
Hundreds of thousands of Fox
Locks are in service throughout
the country.
Fox Nccessories include a number
of useful, fast-selling accessories,
some of which are 6hown here.
Write for full details.

Model TH

Another highly popular tilt-
ing model with standard
Fox Lock. Nickeled steel
spider. $16.

 

Fox Crabk
Fox Detachable Crank
Extension

Enables removal of swinging
crank handle, replacing It
with neat nickeled cap, easily
removed for cranking. $1.50
tire lock
tire lock

 

The Original Paper Car Cover

25 YEARS AGO the possibility of marketing paper bags large enough to cover an automobile, and strong and durable enough to give years of service, was unthought of. Ten years later the automotive industry had developed to such proportions that the Kennedy Car Liner and Bag Co., who had long been making paper bags for most other purposes, intro-* duced the first paper bag to put an automobile in.
This new paper cover, made of heavy Kraft paper, creased to facilitate folding, and reinforced at points of strain, had these advantages over cloth covers—it was non-porous, heat insulating and light-proof—it was, at the same time, cheaper and more durable.

It shielded the car from the finest dust, dirt, and moisture that will penetrate  cloth.    It protected  the  finish of cars from checking due to sudden changes of temperature.    It protected the tires from exposure to light.

KENNEDY DUST-LESS AUTO COVERS come in 5 standard sizes—the 5-Passenger for cars up to 125" wheelbase, the 7-Passenger for larger cars, the Dodge Size for 108" to 114" wheelbases, and the Fore/ Special for all Fords, Chevrolets and cars of similar wheel-base.

Kennedy Car Cover


 

 

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